Small Charity Big Impact Awards… we won!

Celebrations

21 June 2019.

We are very excited to announce another award win… and it’s a national one this time!

Today we’ve been unveiled as a winner* of the Foundation for Social Improvement’s (FSI) Small Charity Big Impact awards, having fought off competition from hundreds of other small charities also doing great work across the country.

The news comes as we are celebrate our 25th year and demonstrates the growing impact and reach of our work.

It is also the penultimate day of Small Charity Week (17-22 June), an annual week of initiatives designed to raise awareness and funds for small charities whilst promoting the work they do.

Our awards entry included our track record of adding, on average, two new friends to isolated or vulnerable people’s networks and scoring 8.5 out of 9 for satisfaction in Grapevine’s work. We also provided a number of case studies to represent what this means in reality for the people we help.

FSI logo

A video explaining why our work is worthy of this award is due out early next week – watch this space!

We’ll be heading to London in July to collect our award. Thank you to everyone who supports our work.

25th anniversary logo

About the FSI

The FSI is a charity supporting the UK’s vibrant small charity sector with training, advocacy and support programmes aimed at building sustainability and sharing knowledge.

Pauline Broomhead CBE, CEO of the FSI, said: “Small charities do amazing work, often having an impact far beyond their size, yet they often don’t receive the recognition and celebration they deserve.

“We’re delighted that over ten years of Small Charity Week thousands of small charities have had the chance to shout about their work and get the support they need, and our Small Charity Big Impact Awards are one of the highlights of the week.

“We are thrilled to award Grapevine Coventry and Warwickshire this prize and congratulate them on their amazing work.”

*£500k – £1 million annual turnover category.

Back down to London town!

Walk and Talk taking place in Coventry

19 June 2019.

Grapevine returns to London today (19 June) to bring news of our pioneering work in Coventry and Warwickshire to the movers, shakers and decision-makers from local and national government, health, housing and social care.

CEO Clare Wightman has been invited to be one of the speakers at the Civil Society Futures* forum, organised by public policy events provider Inside Government.

Clare Wightman
Clare

She will tell the audience how we are using our out-of-the-box thinking and expertise to take a place-based approach to meeting local needs.

What this means for us at the moment is a National Lottery Community Fund project in Stoke Aldermoor (Coventry) to help a group of community-minded residents improve their place.

Their plan focuses on young people, families and connecting cultures. It will bring together civil society, citizens, local authority and businesses to address local priorities through collective action.

Today’s event coincides with ‘Policy Day’ of Small Charity Week – an annual awareness week to celebrate and promote small charities across the UK.

In describing our approach, Clare will give examples of earlier work igniting change with people and communities. Included is the story of Rishard – a young man on the edge of crisis whose needs were misdiagnosed as care, support and treatment.

His real need was for a life shaped by his hopes and dreams, one that could stretch and grow.

With Grapevine, he found his way back with help from a network of good people to become an actor (his dream) and no longer a client with needs to be serviced.

She says: “It’s not magic. It happened because relationships keep on giving – regrouping around new problems or new opportunities in a way that services just can’t.”

Relationships are able to go way beyond the remit of services and will be key to our place-based approach in Stoke Aldermoor and many other current and future projects.

We wish Clare all the best for her latest speaking engagement. Follow her on Twitter at @GrapevineCEO. The event hashtag today is #IGCivilSociety.

25th anniversary logo

*Background

The government’s Civil Society Strategy was published in August 2018 and outlines a plan to enhance collaboration between the voluntary and public sectors.

It recognises the pivotal role that voluntary, community and social enterprise organisations have to play in tackling the challenges we face in today’s society.

Today’s event gives practitioners a forum to debate and disseminate current thinking and information about the strategy from organisations like us who are taking up the opportunity and running with it. We are attending in the lead up to our 25th anniversary celebrations this October (1994 – 2019).

More information

Visit: www.insidegovernment.co.uk/civil-society-strategy

More on Place Based Social Action in Stoke Aldermoor.

Find out more on Small Charity Week here.

Let’s get Around the Kitchen Table!

Jen from Self Care Social

11 June 2019.

It’s Loneliness Awareness Week next week (17-21 June) and the government also launches its #LetsTalkLoneliness campaign to help reduce the stigma associated with admitting to feeling lonely and the vital importance of social connections.

Our Self Care Social ‘Building Connections’ project is funded by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport and the National Lottery Community Fund to prevent or reduce loneliness in people with long term health conditions in Coventry. The aim is for all participants to experience a sense of connected community – and that is where Around the Kitchen Table comes in. It’s about getting people together over a shared interest or skill they’d like to learn together. Our video shows ‘Art Breakfast Club’ to give you an example.

We want to tackle isolation and loneliness by sparking the kind of community action that helps people to organise themselves and lead their own solutions. Getting people Around the Kitchen Table is the perfect chance to do this!

The toolkit consists of a set of questions and suggestions to help you think about how to get your own initiative started and it focuses on three areas:

  • Purpose – what is it that you want to achieve?
  • People – who do you need to gather around you to make this happen?
  • Places – where can/will you gather?

In addition to the information, Grapevine’s Jen is also in the toolkit! A real-life person to chat your ideas through with and to help you create a successful Around the Kitchen Table. She can’t wait to hear your ideas – please contact her on jcooke@grapevinecovandwarks.org to get the full toolkit.

Organisations without walls

A Better Way Network logo

4 June 2019.

“And again there was that sense of relationships being able to keep on giving and reconfigure themselves around new problems.”

Our CEO Clare Wightman has written a new blog for an independent network of social change activists known as ‘A Better Way’.

Clare Wightman
Clare

Many of the members, of which she is one, are from the voluntary sector but others are from different sectors. Their common vision is of helping to liberate people’s potential rather than writing them off as problems, difficult to reach localities and hard hit communities.

Clare’s latest blog is about services having their place but also their limits. What people need in life, she says, is other good people around them who can back them up, encourage, problem solve and find opportunities.

The outcome being that these people and networks of help are there when services can’t be.

It doesn’t mean that services can walk away and leave people to it. It means that this is the kind of help that flexes, reciprocates and strengthens in ways services can’t.

“It’s our way of creating ‘organisations without walls’ where people and solutions come first, not organisational identities and self interests.”

To read more, click here.

‘Crafting’ community the Grapevine way

Bell Green library arts and crafts group

17 April 2019.

A purl-er of an idea from two women who met at a Coventry knitting group is blossoming into a network of friends coming together weekly to chat, craft and overcome isolation.

Even when one member is having a bad week or thinks they may not show up, the others rally round and they come anyway.

So how did the arts and crafts group start?

Michelle, from Grapevine’s Help and Connect project, met Tracy at Bell Green library’s knitting circle – a large, animated, all-female group who gather each Thursday to swap skills and put the world to rights.

Although beneficial for many, Michelle and Tracy felt the dynamics weren’t quite right for quieter voices who needed time to talk and get to know others first.

The ladies they were thinking of had learning disabilities, long term health conditions or different experiences with their mental health.

So the duo took a shared love of arts and crafts – plus a generous helping of Tracy’s personal craft supplies – and set up a new, smaller group on a different day.

Still at the library, the two-hour Tuesday session provides a space to create and catch up on the week’s events, lending an empathetic ear, advice or practical support as needed.

There are five core members (including a man now) of the purposely select group, meaning it remains safe and supportive – no posters on a notice board here. Everyone involved is accepting of one another’s differences.

Tea and crafts at the library
Members bring a contribution towards refreshments

Its need is undeniable as people regularly arrive early and leave later than the scheduled finish time. The session helps them feel more connected.

The library location has stuck because it is local and accessible even on days when it can be hard to leave the house. The library provides hot water and the group brings the tea, coffee and biscuits.

The five have also enjoyed Christmas lunch together at a local café and a cooked breakfast at another eatery across town.

Tracy windmill painting
Tracy’s latest painting

Encouragement was evident at the session we attended when painting was on the agenda (other crafts have included Christmas decorations and 5D art) as Tracy coaxed: “If you always do the same thing, you never stretch yourself and you never find out what you can do.”

A fitting way to sum it up we thought.

Michelle recalls another recent exchange with Tracy along the lines of: “Are we doing something good here then?” – to which Michelle replied, “You don’t realise the impact this is having on people!”

From small gestures, come big things. And when Michelle moves on to help others get connected, she can be sure the group will continue.

Help and Connect by Grapevine is commissioned by Coventry City Council.

We’re celebrating this story as one of our 25 stories for 25 years of Grapevine. Look out for more stories and a big event coming this October!

25th anniversary logo

£250k government and lottery funding puts Stoke Aldermoor community at helm to tackle local issues

Community choice

18 February 2019.

A quarter of a million in government and lottery cash is being injected into one of Coventry’s most deprived areas following a successful bid by Grapevine and a group of community-minded citizens.

PBSA map

It’s part of a £2.3 million nation-wide pot of funding to help people across England make their local areas a better place to live by investing their own time, skills and connections.

Announcing the funding in a House of Commons debate last week (14 February), Minister for Civil Society Mims Davies said:

“This investment in communities the length and breadth of the country will help even more people take action on the issues they care about most, including helping more volunteering, giving more money directly to local causes that people feel connected with in their community and supporting even more simple neighbourly acts, which can mean so much.”

Of the 10 triumphant partnerships, just two are Midlands-based and only Grapevine in the West Midlands / Warwickshire area will benefit from the money provided jointly by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) and The National Lottery Community Fund.

It follows January’s news that Grapevine is bringing another £97k into the city to boost a community of connected self-care amongst residents with a long term health condition or a chronic illness (also funded by DCMS and The National Lottery Community Fund).

Six women from Stoke Aldermoor
Six women from Stoke Aldermoor are leading the project

The £250k Place Based Social Action Scheme in Stoke Aldermoor will continue to build on foundations already laid by a group of local residents led by six women.

The six have been meeting weekly for several months to share stories and ideas on how they might transform their neighbourhood into a place less divided by difference and more united by a common purpose to be better.

The process to this point has involved around 500 conversations, 10 social suppers, a trip to Weston-super-Mare and a bit of Grapevine magic!

Social supper
Social supper

The group’s vision specifically focuses on children, young people and their families with a series of ongoing activities to help integrate and connect the different communities living there.

Some of the ideas in the ‘social action plan’ so far include a one stop support shop; more training opportunities for young people; improved provision for families to build parenting skills and raise aspirations; a family walking group; a summer school; and the creation of an annual festival to celebrate the area’s diversity.

Stoke Aldermoor is not unique in many of the challenges it faces – reduction in services, integration of new arrivals, unemployment, crime, social apathy and external stigma.

The funding however greatly increases its chances of changing these dynamics by getting others involved, building community cohesion, dealing with problems together and embracing future possibilities.

Follow the Stoke Aldermoor story as it unfolds on our website, Facebook, Twitter, Wakelet and very soon… Instagram!

Two sisters take on The Big Smoke

Mel and Melissa masterclass audience

11 February 2019.

The two Mels – not to be confused with classic comedy duo The Two Ronnies – are today giving a masterclass on movement building at the Social Media Exchange event in north London.

Mel and Melissa Feb 2019
Mel and Melissa at #SMEX19

Otherwise known as #SMEX19, the day-long training day is about the power of storytelling to help those in the charity sector harness the impact of stories to raise awareness of their cause, spark action and bring more people (and funds) into their world.

It is presented by social enterprise Sound Delivery.

Grapevine Deputy CEO Mel Smith and her sister, community organiser Melissa Smith, are hosting an interactive session called ‘Building a movement on a shoestring’ which they hope will inspire members of their audience to nurture their own communities, bringing out people’s “hidden gifts” and enjoying some “golden moments”.

The two sisters are combining their learning from building a number of movements over the years including Good2Go, Swim and Tonic, Feel Good Community and more recently, Connecting for Good and Self Care Social.

The latter two movements share a common thread in trying to tackle the widespread social issue of isolation. While Connecting for Good cuts across loneliness in all people and communities, Self Care Social’s community is dedicated to those with long term health conditions and chronic illnesses. Both movements are Coventry-based and by Grapevine, with funding from the National Lottery Community Fund and Better Health, Better Care, Better Value programme respectively.

As with any honest imparting of knowledge, Mel and Melissa will also share some of the mistakes they’ve made along the way and the lessons they learned from them.

To mark the event, Mel recorded a short vlog and has also written an interesting blog about the emergence of a new movement called Swimmers Social which is tapping into the collective power of a group of – you guessed it – social swimmers. We are hosting her blog on our Connecting for Good site here.

H Team brings learning disability to life for trainee social workers

The H Team

15 January 2019.

The next generation of social workers from Coventry University have been getting an insight into people with a learning disability directly from the very people who know the most about it!

Grapevine’s Sam and a core group of people with different learning disabilities who make up the H Team visited the university last month for the innovative session.

The H Team
Here come the H Team!

The ‘H’ stands for Health and that is what the team is all about – educating peers, professionals and services alike on how to stay healthy and well when you have a learning disability.

This advice and training is vital for a section of the community proven to have generally poorer physical and mental health and a significantly lower life expectancy than the rest of the population.

But it wouldn’t be this way if there was greater uptake on annual health checks with GPs, promptly diagnosed health conditions, effective treatment and more informed self care.

And improvements can always be made in the way health and social care professionals communicate with people with a learning disability – hence the need for some interesting training right at the beginning of a career in social work.

During the Coventry University awareness session, students were able to get to know the seven members of the H Team, each one with his or her own unique story, likes and dislikes.

Games and quizzes helped break down any barriers, including one called ‘Scaredy Pants’ where the students wrote their fears on paper pants hung on a make-shift washing line.

Each fear was examined with H Team participants giving students advice and strategies to help overcome them. Some fears were even reflected on both sides – for example, a fear of communicating in a way that was not understood or misinterpreted. The students didn’t want to make a person uncomfortable and the H Team didn’t want to appear ‘stupid’ for not understanding.

The ‘New Perspective’ game then sees society’s labels discarded on the floor and ‘Mum’ or ‘Activist’ (and many others) used instead. Team members said they are not defined by their disability.

By the end of the session, the students and H Team were working together to develop an assessment tool that would equip professionals to phrase questions in different ways and encourage them to consider individuals holistically, particularly including their mental health. Social prescribing and making community connections may be things not previously considered for example.

“We got great feedback,” Sam said. “The students loved the session – having the H Team there to talk to them and give them advice was better than any pen exercise! It was learning through a first-hand experience that they will always remember.”

H Team sessions like this continue on a regular basis throughout the year and the H Team is always looking for new members to bring diversity and knowledge to their group.

If this could be you or someone you know, please call Sam on 02476 631040 extension 112 or email skeoghcollins@grapevinecovandwarks.org

£97k coming to Coventry to boost emerging culture of self care

7 January 2019.

Grapevine is leading the charge against loneliness for local people with long term health conditions, thanks to £97,261 in new government funding.

The sizeable slice of the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport’s (DCMS) £11.5m pie is one of only two grants in the Warwickshire area (the other being the People’s Pantry in Nuneaton and Bedworth), with several more awarded across the West Midlands.

99,000 people in Coventry have a long term health condition
Artwork by @FeelGoodMel

The Building Connections Fund provides a cash injection for 126 much-needed organisations and projects throughout England that are finding innovative ways to tackle the ongoing social issue of loneliness.

The fund was created in 2018 in partnership between the government, Big Lottery Fund* and the Co-op Foundation.

Minister for Loneliness, Mims Davies, said: “There is no one cause of loneliness and therefore no one solution. That is why we are working alongside a broad range of businesses, voluntary organisations and local councils to ensure that those who feel alone are best supported.”

Happiness Walk
A Self Care Social ‘Happiness Walk’

The announcement about Grapevine’s successful bid came just before Christmas and will help bolster growing Coventry-based initiative Self Care Social.

The first Self Care Social event took place in July 2018 at Coventry University’s Social Enterprise Hub and has been gathering momentum ever since.

The movement’s vision is of a connected culture of self care for the estimated 99,000 – or approximately one in three – residents in Coventry who have a long term health condition.

The vision itself was co-created by some of the people it is aimed at – including former teacher Melissa Smith, who was forced to find an alternative career after being diagnosed with the rare spinal condition Symptomatic Tarlov Cyst Disease in 2014.

Common shared issues
Members of the movement have shared the common issues they face daily

Melissa went on to secure a role as a community organiser for Grapevine through the Better Health, Better Care, Better Value programme and build her own social enterprise Feel Good Community.

She and the Self Care ‘socialites’ hope to gather more people in from the fringes to support one another’s ideas, build collective action for positive change and most important of all, make the journey together. The Building Connections funding will help them do that.

If you or someone you know would like to get involved in Self Care Social – sharing self care tips, making friends, telling your story to inspire others, organising social events… making cake – visit Self Care Social on Facebook or drop us a line here and we’ll pass your details on. There are free events coming up in January and February.

Read more about how Self Care Social got started on the Feel Good Com website here.

*The Big Lottery Fund becomes the National Lottery Community Fund from 30 January.