Our September update

September update

10 September 2019.

It’s only the second week of September but so much has happened in the last two weeks, we couldn’t wait to share some of what we’ve been up to (lots of other work has been going on too).


Thursday 29 August

The New Vibes / Fight for Your Right to Party crew hosted their very first inclusive club night at JJs Coventry. It was a great success, powered by a group who’d formed only weeks earlier around the idea that everyone should be able to enjoy a night out if they want to.

The event was an immersive experience with silent disco and DJ set by the New Vibes team. The venue is fully accessible throughout and further nights are in the pipeline. Watch this space and follow Fight for Your Right to Party on Facebook for the latest news.

Got an idea, skill or venue you’d like to share? Get in touch, get involved! New Vibes meet up every Monday at 5.30pm – info available on their Facebook page or by emailing sgreener@grapevinecovandwarks.org.

Pic credits: Alan Van Wijgerden (click to enlarge).


Friday 30 August

The next day saw the launch of #socialactionhubcovandwarks with a two-hour Walk and Talk through Coventry city centre. Over 70 people joined us (beating last year’s August Walk and Talk) to walk, talk, share stories, listen to ideas, feel inspired and spark change.

Much, much more is in development with our Connecting for Good Cov, Self Care Social and Coventry Youth Activists projects – plus many other offshoots and movements all aiming to act against isolation and loneliness in our city and beyond.

Pic credits: John Whitmore Photography (click to enlarge).


Saturday 31 August

The first ever CYA Saturdays blog landed! Written by Coventry Youth Activists about their first Saturday night out together in Coventry, the blog aimed to share their experience with young people who may be worried about getting out and about. The CYA Saturdays campaign wants to change the statistic that one in three young disabled people spend less than an hour outside home on a Saturday.

With pics, videos and reviews of city centre venues in terms of welcome and accessibility, this blog is not to be missed!

CYA night out


Wednesday 4 September

Collaboration Station started at Drapers Bar and Kitchen, offering a range of tables generating different ideas to make Coventry a better, more connected city.

The informal evening brought dreamers, creatives, activists, doers, scientists, makers, entrepreneurs together to join the collaboration. A follow up is set to run on Wednesday 9 October, 5.30-7.30pm.

Our nosey parka


Wednesday 4 – Friday 6 September

Grapevine took some time out of the office for three Team Days at a venue in west Coventry.

Time away allowed us to reconnect, share stories, experiences and expertise, and focus on our future. We got stuck in planning our Impact Event at Coventry University on 12 October to celebrate 25 years of Grapevine (look out for more details soon!) and even had fun with a few games. Camera-shy colleagues also had to endure some professional photos with John Whitmore Photography.

The Grapevine team 2019


Tuesday 10 September

Deputy CEO Mel Smith (can you spot her below?) joined Coventry City of Culture Trust‘s first Culture Conversations morning at the Herbert Art Gallery and Museum alongside a whole host of public and professionals interested in the big opportunities before, during and after our year in 2021. New connections and conversations were made and started – watch this space!

Pic credit: Coventry City of Culture Trust.

Culture Conversation

Finally… please welcome new starter Danielle Breslin who joins us as a Journey Guide on the Accelerate programme, helping people into paid employment in North Warwickshire.

Why Ignite shows that change starts with us

Volunteer drive in Willenhall

10 July 2019.

It’s near to an impossible task – writing a story about a project that operates, and likes to remain, uncredited behind the scenes. A project supporting a myriad of offshoot initiatives, spawned by ideas from informal conversations and brought to life by diverse members of the community.

But here we are. Almost four years on from the start of the Ignite project in Coventry’s Willenhall neighbourhood and just a few months before its end.

Ignite was created through a partnership between Grapevine and Central England Law Centre. On the one hand, Grapevine knew how to think outside the box and connect people. On the other, the Law Centre had the legal expertise to unlock systems and rights, handing power to the powerless.

The project set out on its four-year journey in 2015 with Coventry City Council and WM Housing Group alongside as integral partners in making Willenhall a better, more connected place. A Willenhall where help could be offered early before people plunged into crisis and services had to take over. The fact was that ongoing cuts to budgets meant public services were less and less able to be there.

The journey hasn’t been easy – bringing change to systems and beliefs is never linear and without complications. But Ignite team leader, John Toman is hopeful things won’t revert when he and the team move on.

“Ignite has played a unique role in the changes in Willenhall,” he says. “We have nothing to gain from building relationships and confidence in the community and local services.

“Our neutral position helps people trust that we are there to help. We sometimes ask the more difficult questions but we are always honest about why we need to know. From there, energy comes, connections are made and people start to find their own solutions to problems they are facing. And because they provide the solutions, there’s a greater chance of sustaining them for longer.”

Volunteer drive in Willenhall
A volunteer drive helped gather more support

So far the initiatives ‘ignited’ by local people with the project’s backing (and help from community facilities, Willenhall Library and places of worship) include: a uniform swap shop for parents; a weekly grub club with food donations from a local supermarket available to eat and also take home; a Wednesday walking group led by residents who want to keep fit and help familiarise newcomers with their neighbourhood; a Women of Willenhall women’s support group; and a homework club for youngsters run by a local teenager.

From improving a form to make it easier to claim a benefit, to working with renters and housing providers to iron out any issues complying with their tenancy agreement – and much, much more in between – change has been steady, subtle and anchored in mutual respect.

A volunteer drive in March helped bring a small group of eight together to receive weekly training inputs at Wood Side Family Hub that will help give them the knowledge and skills to run their own groups and activities. They each also bring strengths and talents to the table. It is what Ignite set out to do – people in Willenhall doing things for other people in Willenhall, and the future is looking bright.

25th anniversary logo

More information

We are telling this story of impact as part of our 25th anniversary celebrations.

If you live in Willenhall and want to get involved in your local community, simply drop in at Wood Side Family Hub to find out what’s on.

If you are interested in how Ignite has taken a different approach to getting at the root causes of social problems, not just dealing with the consequences, get in touch with us.

Let’s get Around the Kitchen Table!

Jen from Self Care Social

11 June 2019.

It’s Loneliness Awareness Week next week (17-21 June) and the government also launches its #LetsTalkLoneliness campaign to help reduce the stigma associated with admitting to feeling lonely and the vital importance of social connections.

Our Self Care Social ‘Building Connections’ project is funded by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport and the National Lottery Community Fund to prevent or reduce loneliness in people with long term health conditions in Coventry. The aim is for all participants to experience a sense of connected community – and that is where Around the Kitchen Table comes in. It’s about getting people together over a shared interest or skill they’d like to learn together. Our video shows ‘Art Breakfast Club’ to give you an example.

We want to tackle isolation and loneliness by sparking the kind of community action that helps people to organise themselves and lead their own solutions. Getting people Around the Kitchen Table is the perfect chance to do this!

The toolkit consists of a set of questions and suggestions to help you think about how to get your own initiative started and it focuses on three areas:

  • Purpose – what is it that you want to achieve?
  • People – who do you need to gather around you to make this happen?
  • Places – where can/will you gather?

In addition to the information, Grapevine’s Jen is also in the toolkit! A real-life person to chat your ideas through with and to help you create a successful Around the Kitchen Table. She can’t wait to hear your ideas – please contact her on jcooke@grapevinecovandwarks.org to get the full toolkit.

Organisations without walls

A Better Way Network logo

4 June 2019.

“And again there was that sense of relationships being able to keep on giving and reconfigure themselves around new problems.”

Our CEO Clare Wightman has written a new blog for an independent network of social change activists known as ‘A Better Way’.

Clare Wightman
Clare

Many of the members, of which she is one, are from the voluntary sector but others are from different sectors. Their common vision is of helping to liberate people’s potential rather than writing them off as problems, difficult to reach localities and hard hit communities.

Clare’s latest blog is about services having their place but also their limits. What people need in life, she says, is other good people around them who can back them up, encourage, problem solve and find opportunities.

The outcome being that these people and networks of help are there when services can’t be.

It doesn’t mean that services can walk away and leave people to it. It means that this is the kind of help that flexes, reciprocates and strengthens in ways services can’t.

“It’s our way of creating ‘organisations without walls’ where people and solutions come first, not organisational identities and self interests.”

To read more, click here.

She believed she could so she did! Meet Melissa

Celebration of Doers

30 May 2019.

A special event recently brought together a group of ‘doers’ helping to grow a movement of people who have a long term health condition or chronic illness in common. The idea of the event was simply to celebrate how far they’ve come over the past few months.

The Saturday afternoon shindig was hosted inside an impressive shop front theatre that inhabits a once disused retail premises in a Coventry arcade.

Celebration of Doers
Melissa (centre) at the Celebration of Doers

Setting the term ‘disused’ to one side, it could almost be a metaphor for the transformation undergone by the woman who organised the ‘Celebration of Doers’ – from teacher, to patient, to community organiser and social entrepreneur.

To tell Melissa Smith that in just four years she’d grow a community of thousands based around the idea that creativity boosts wellbeing – and have won an ‘Inspiring Entrepreneur’ award from Coventry University and Santander – would have been met with complete disbelief. It has been a long and often painful road.

Following a spinal injury after a routinely energetic gym session and subsequent injury at work, Melissa was diagnosed with a rare, incurable condition called Symptomatic Tarlov Cyst Disease – painful fluid-filled cysts rooted in the vertebrae at the base of the spine.

So rare in fact that it took many months and numerous appointments to convince specialists that the condition was the problem and not underlying stress from a recent close bereavement. Melissa also later developed ME.

Even with a diagnosis, Melissa’s life became a waiting game – for the next appointment, consultation or surgery and all the while focussing on every symptom. Her teaching career was over. But some tough love from her older sister (who also works for Grapevine) provided the impetus she needed to take a love of art and turn it into a business.

“I didn’t want to swim or do yoga. I wanted to put on my pink gloves, box, flip tyres and do wolf runs. But I couldn’t any more. I was living my story but without a call to action. I was struggling.

“My sister said I should focus on what I can do, not what I can’t. So my passion for using creativity as a tool to feel good became my reason to get back up. Doodling with my pad and pens had seen me through many dark times in hospital and at home.”

Self portrait by Melissa Smith
Self portrait by Melissa Smith

Armed with a grant from UnLtd and the community building tools she was learning from Grapevine, Melissa started to carve out a name for her Feel Good Community both on and offline.

Self Care Social came along a few months later with some funding from the NHS’s Integration Better Care Fund and Grapevine employed Melissa. The idea being that self-care when you’re poorly is hard to practice alone at home and much easier to share with others who understand. Although, it is sometimes hard to attend the social side of Self Care Social, no-one is ever ‘written off’ and they can come when they are able.

And now this is Melissa. A fully fledged community organiser, movement builder and social entrepreneur in the making. It may take her a bit longer than other people (her own words) but she will get there, altering direction slightly with new challenges but always on course.

She’s bringing a Festival of Creativity and Wellbeing to life at Coventry’s Herbert Art Gallery and Museum on 15 June with her friend Kerry. Feel Good product development and an online shop are also coming soon.

Melissa Smith
Melissa

Back at the celebration party, if anyone understands what it takes to show up and get on with things, it’s Melissa. Gathering these people together for a fun few hours of sharing games, food, creativity and stories seems a fitting way to mark everyone’s achievements thus far.

“I’m meeting more new and different types of people than I ever would have as a teacher.

“I think now that becoming poorly was a catalyst for creating change in my life. I had thought there might be a cure and that doctors would have all the answers.

“The challenges I’ve faced have brought creativity, community, positivity and a new outlook for me. A new way of doing things.

“It’s given me a voice and Grapevine has given me the platform to do all this. They’re willing to take the risk on ideas and people like me.”

We’re celebrating Melissa’s story as one of our 25 stories for #25yearsofGrapevine sparking community action, strengthening people and shifting power in Coventry and Warwickshire.

25th anniversary logo

CYA Sofa Safari in Coventry city centre? Tell us more!

Getting ready for show time

28 May 2019.

The sun was smiling down on Coventry Youth Activists’ (CYA) performance for youth loneliness last Saturday (25 May).

CYA and their sofa were at Broadgate in the city centre to raise awareness of the troubling statistic that one in three young disabled people spend less than an hour outside of home on a Saturday.

Open Theatre Company provided the artistic direction to the ‘sofa safari’ performance dreamed up by CYA, and the safari element was made possible by Imagineer UK giving movement to the sofa through wheels.

All told, it was an attention grabbing event that disrupted the bustling shopping area’s usual Saturday happenings and propelled a group of determined young people straight into the spotlight.

CYA’s Lily explains: “We fight for disabled people’s rights… they can be kind of bored and alone and we want to change that. So people can get out more and be accepted and just make everyone feel they fit in.

“So we thought if we did this, it would get it out more so people would find out about it.”

And they have. A very big well done and thank you to all of you.

Here’s our pick of the best pics – click to enlarge each photo. Find out more about CYA and how you might like to join in here.

Rehearsals at EGO Performance Company.

Performance preparations.

Show time!

Photographs by John Whitmore Photography | Follow @thedarkshed on Instagram.

Gaynor’s story – from self-doubt to self-belief

21 May 2019.

The third in our series of 25 stories for 25 years of Grapevine is the story of Gaynor Leech.

Gaynor was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2010 and as a result of radiotherapy treatment the following year, she developed Lymphoedema – a life-long condition that causes swelling in the body’s tissues.

Although there is no cure, it can be managed and treated but this has meant a huge change in lifestyle for Gaynor. It hasn’t held her back though from establishing a community of help for others with the same condition. And this is where Grapevine comes in.

Gaynor (centre) with Melissa and Dawn from Grapevine (left and right)

Her involvement with Self Care Social, Feel Good Ambassadors and the Collective Leaders Group has in her own words, “transformed the way I think about volunteering. I have found a way to incorporate everything I have learned from Grapevine into my lymphoedema support group.”

She admits her approach to running Lymph-What-Oedema (L-W-O) had previously harked back to a time before the internet where geography determined reach and having a platform to share stories on a much wider scale simply didn’t exist. Gaynor takes up the tale from her first Innovation Factory with Grapevine…

“I am fortunate, I do not have a problem in walking into a room full of strangers, but it was clear from the start that this was very different from anything I had ever attended before.

“I had struggled with both the business side and getting our voice heard in the community.

“I was so out of my depth and comfort zone on the first course but it really did change my thinking. There were so many ideas, the language used was different, the importance of storytelling, the pledges all very new to me.”

Gaynor is now a Self Care Champion

Helping people and communities use their untapped power to create better futures – strengthening through natural networks of community support that bring opportunity and help people take charge of their lives is what Grapevine is all about. This has certainly proved true for Gaynor.

“The most important aspect of working with Grapevine is the people I meet. Each and every one of them either lives with a long-term condition or takes care of someone who has a challenged life, and yet they are passionate about helping others with daily challenges.

“I come home feeling inspired and this then reflects in my approach to life and volunteer work. Through the storytelling, I can see how my writing style has changed.

“Living with lymphoedema can be very isolating so working on social self-care is very important to my group. A place where they will not be judged and a place where we can share knowledge, information and community. I do not want others to feel the way I did when I was first diagnosed.

“All of this progress aside, I was still surprised – and thrilled – to become a Self Care Champion for the Self Care Forum recently.”

For those in similar situations, Gaynor’s advice is to “look around at your local community, network – see who is out there, ask for help. See if there are organisations that are of similar size to yours or with the same ethos.

“The training I have received from Grapevine has been invaluable – the connections you make will be one of your biggest assets.”

And what does the future hold?

“The journey of living with lymphoedema and running L-W-O are things I would never have envisaged for myself. Even with all the knocks and frustrations, I love what I do, I love that I have a purpose in life and while I do take good care of myself, I love being busy. Importantly, I love that in a small way L-W-O has contributed to raising awareness of lymphoedema.

“Thank you to Melissa, Naomi and Dawn for the encouragement, help, patience, time and support that has helped me transform my thinking of volunteering in the 21st century voluntary sector.”

25th anniversary logo

‘Crafting’ community the Grapevine way

Bell Green library arts and crafts group

17 April 2019.

A purl-er of an idea from two women who met at a Coventry knitting group is blossoming into a network of friends coming together weekly to chat, craft and overcome isolation.

Even when one member is having a bad week or thinks they may not show up, the others rally round and they come anyway.

So how did the arts and crafts group start?

Michelle, from Grapevine’s Help and Connect project, met Tracy at Bell Green library’s knitting circle – a large, animated, all-female group who gather each Thursday to swap skills and put the world to rights.

Although beneficial for many, Michelle and Tracy felt the dynamics weren’t quite right for quieter voices who needed time to talk and get to know others first.

The ladies they were thinking of had learning disabilities, long term health conditions or different experiences with their mental health.

So the duo took a shared love of arts and crafts – plus a generous helping of Tracy’s personal craft supplies – and set up a new, smaller group on a different day.

Still at the library, the two-hour Tuesday session provides a space to create and catch up on the week’s events, lending an empathetic ear, advice or practical support as needed.

There are five core members (including a man now) of the purposely select group, meaning it remains safe and supportive – no posters on a notice board here. Everyone involved is accepting of one another’s differences.

Tea and crafts at the library
Members bring a contribution towards refreshments

Its need is undeniable as people regularly arrive early and leave later than the scheduled finish time. The session helps them feel more connected.

The library location has stuck because it is local and accessible even on days when it can be hard to leave the house. The library provides hot water and the group brings the tea, coffee and biscuits.

The five have also enjoyed Christmas lunch together at a local café and a cooked breakfast at another eatery across town.

Tracy windmill painting
Tracy’s latest painting

Encouragement was evident at the session we attended when painting was on the agenda (other crafts have included Christmas decorations and 5D art) as Tracy coaxed: “If you always do the same thing, you never stretch yourself and you never find out what you can do.”

A fitting way to sum it up we thought.

Michelle recalls another recent exchange with Tracy along the lines of: “Are we doing something good here then?” – to which Michelle replied, “You don’t realise the impact this is having on people!”

From small gestures, come big things. And when Michelle moves on to help others get connected, she can be sure the group will continue.

Help and Connect by Grapevine is commissioned by Coventry City Council.

We’re celebrating this story as one of our 25 stories for 25 years of Grapevine. Look out for more stories and a big event coming this October!

25th anniversary logo

£250k government and lottery funding puts Stoke Aldermoor community at helm to tackle local issues

Community choice

18 February 2019.

A quarter of a million in government and lottery cash is being injected into one of Coventry’s most deprived areas following a successful bid by Grapevine and a group of community-minded citizens.

PBSA map

It’s part of a £2.3 million nation-wide pot of funding to help people across England make their local areas a better place to live by investing their own time, skills and connections.

Announcing the funding in a House of Commons debate last week (14 February), Minister for Civil Society Mims Davies said:

“This investment in communities the length and breadth of the country will help even more people take action on the issues they care about most, including helping more volunteering, giving more money directly to local causes that people feel connected with in their community and supporting even more simple neighbourly acts, which can mean so much.”

Of the 10 triumphant partnerships, just two are Midlands-based and only Grapevine in the West Midlands / Warwickshire area will benefit from the money provided jointly by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) and The National Lottery Community Fund.

It follows January’s news that Grapevine is bringing another £97k into the city to boost a community of connected self-care amongst residents with a long term health condition or a chronic illness (also funded by DCMS and The National Lottery Community Fund).

Six women from Stoke Aldermoor
Six women from Stoke Aldermoor are leading the project

The £250k Place Based Social Action Scheme in Stoke Aldermoor will continue to build on foundations already laid by a group of local residents led by six women.

The six have been meeting weekly for several months to share stories and ideas on how they might transform their neighbourhood into a place less divided by difference and more united by a common purpose to be better.

The process to this point has involved around 500 conversations, 10 social suppers, a trip to Weston-super-Mare and a bit of Grapevine magic!

Social supper
Social supper

The group’s vision specifically focuses on children, young people and their families with a series of ongoing activities to help integrate and connect the different communities living there.

Some of the ideas in the ‘social action plan’ so far include a one stop support shop; more training opportunities for young people; improved provision for families to build parenting skills and raise aspirations; a family walking group; a summer school; and the creation of an annual festival to celebrate the area’s diversity.

Stoke Aldermoor is not unique in many of the challenges it faces – reduction in services, integration of new arrivals, unemployment, crime, social apathy and external stigma.

The funding however greatly increases its chances of changing these dynamics by getting others involved, building community cohesion, dealing with problems together and embracing future possibilities.

Follow the Stoke Aldermoor story as it unfolds on our website, Facebook, Twitter, Wakelet and very soon… Instagram!